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The Nightwatchman – Issue 20 (print)

£10.00

Winter 2017 edition, released in December.

Please note that payments for this product will be taken on www.thenightwatchman.net. P&P will be added at the checkout

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About the Product

Cricket’s past is steeped in a tradition of great writing and Wisden is making sure its future will be too. The Nightwatchman is a quarterly collection of essays and long-form articles which debuted in March 2013 and is available in book and e-book formats.

Issue 20 contents list:

Simon Barnes on the sporting moments where everything is on a different plane
Marcus Berkmann has some odd friends
Jonathan Liew looks at how cricket’s language reinforces a macho image
Kamran Abbasi on what the Ashes mean to a Pakistan supporter
Nicholas Hogg traces the history of the game through five paintings
Stephen Bates paints a portrait of a great Kent spinner, who died 100 years ago
Roger Morgan-Grenville is faced with the last match of the season
Neil Lyndon on a cricketing bond between father and son
Broadening the mind – photographs of travelling cricketers
Isabelle Duncan watches Eileen Ash, the oldest surviving Test cricketer, take flight
Andrew Lycett investigates the inks between cricket and espionage
Alex Massie toured Pakistan recently and guess who he got out?
Ashley Gray looks at racial prejudice in 1970s and 80s Australian cricket
Nic Copeland wants a bit more flexibility in the batting order
Luke Alfred despairs of modern-day cricket in South Africa
Nick Campion travels back 30 years
Mike Pattinson sees parallels between cricket and ultimate frisbee
Luke Templeman looks at where Australian cricketers learn their trade
Tim Cook talks us through a walk to Lord’s
Sam Perry wonders about the fate of outsiders in professional cricket
Jarrod Kimber goes back to childhood